Aboriginal

AddToAny

Share

Indigenous fatherhood: a celebration

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine
The summer months span both Father’s Day and Indigenous Peoples’ Day. In this article, we’re honoured to share interviews with two Indigenous dads on what fatherhood means to them.

Q&A: Shawn Duthie

Shawn lives in Revelstoke with his wife, Leah. He’s been a foster dad for over a decade, and his adopted kids range in age from 4 to 33.

National Indigenous Peoples Day What it is and how to celebrate

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

National Indigenous Peoples Day is celebrated throughout Canada on June 21. It’s a day to celebrate the heritage, diverse cultures, and outstanding achievements of First Nations, Inuit, and Métis people. For the adoption community, it’s also an opportunity to reflect on how adoption has been used to harm Indigenous people, and to get involved in making things better for Indigenous kids, their families, and their communities.

40 years of adoption: Fostering and adoption

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

In this series Marion Crook, author and adoptive mom, takes us on a journey through changes in adoption in BC. Here, in part three, she focuses on adoption from foster care.

Fostering and adoption: then and now

The Adoptive Families Association of BC is celebrating its 40th anniversary. This is the third in a series exploring adoption and fostering over those last 40 years. It focuses on the evolution in foster care practice since 1977.

Why profiles matter

Source: 
Focus on Adoption Magazine

From time to time, people express concerns over the profiles we circulate of kids in BC who are waiting for adoptive families. In this issue’s Opinion column, a social worker and an adoptive parent explain how they protect kids’ privacy, and why profiles matter. Want to share your opinion on an adoption-related topic?  We’d love to hear from you! Contact us at editor@bcadoption.com.

Why profiles matter: a social worker’s perspective

By Kirsty Stormer

Caring for Indigenous families

Source: 
Focus on Adoption Magazine

The Indigenous Perspectives Society (IPS), formerly Caring for First Nations Children Society, is a registered charitable non-profit founded in 1994. IPS has played a significant role in the delivery of training and policy development in the Indigenous child welfare field. We interviewed IPS staff about their recent move into providing support and training to caregivers of Indigenous children who are in foster care.

Reconciliation for everyone

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

In 2007, the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society and the Assembly of First Nations filed a human rights complaint against the Canadian Federal government, alleging that Canada’s failure to provide equitable and culturally based child welfare services to First Nations children on-reserve amounts to discrimination on the basis of race and ethnic origin. In January, the Tribunal ruled against the government. In this piece, Andrea Auger of the Caring Society reflects on the importance and implications of this decision.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Aboriginal