Adoptees

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Adopting orphans in times of disaster or war

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

For many Canadians the horrific images from the December 2004 Tsunami in South Asia, inspired the desire to adopt an orphaned child.

While these desires are normal, there are compelling reasons why adoption from war torn or disaster struck nations is strongly discouraged.

The United Nations (UN), stands strongly against any immediate adoptions in such situations and states; “Special care must be taken to prevent the hasty placement of children outside their own country.”

Finding a forever family: Better late than never

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

When Deborah Bailey and her husband Edward, first met their then three-and-a-half-year old daughter, Ola, in a Russian orphanage, her first words to them were, “You’re late.”

They immediately realized that this little preschooler was a force to be reckoned with. Deborah says that at the same time as Ola was being so forthright, she had a single tear in her eye. This was an early indication of Ola’s desperate need for belonging and her intense fear of it.

Issues Around Adolescence and Adoption

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

While many adopted teens appear to navigate the challenges of adolescence in a similar manner to their non-adopted peers, there is consensus that the teen years can present special challenges for adopted children. For this reason, parents are well advised to at least inform themselves about what these might be.

The Ancient Mariner of Adoption Reflects on His Work

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Spending a few hours with David Kirk, author of the books Shared Fate, Adoptive Kinship, and Exploring Adoptive Family Life, is a remarkable experience.  He has lived through so much in his life and has much to say about politics, religion, sociology, and, more personally, what it means to be Jewish, a father, and an adoptive parent. He is one of those people who can make meaningful connections between events and experience, effortlessly.

Beyond sexual abuse: Families can promote healing

Source: 
Beyond Sexual Abuse: The Healing Power of Adoptive Families

Even if sexual abuse is not disclosed in a child’s history, foster and adoptive parents must be prepared to deal with issues of sexuality and sexual abuse.

Was My Child Abused?
If your child’s worker does not mention sexual abuse, and records say nothing, did your child escape this form of abuse? Maybe. Maybe not. Sexual abuse often goes unnoticed, and unrecorded, and often children are reluctant to talk about abuse, and few abusers confess to their crimes.

Beyond the books - Blindsided by attachment

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Aleisha and Garry Jenkins adopted their first child, Sadie, as a newborn from the US. Two years later, they approached the Ministry of Children and Family Development (MCFD), hoping to adopt two older children. They were surprised when the MCFD proposed a sibling group of two: Elliot, a little boy of 18 months, and his sister, Maya, three years old. Though they didn’t expect such young children, the couple pursued the adoption.

Adoption from an adoptee's perspective

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

I was adopted at birth, 22 years ago, but I've never felt like anything was missing from my life. Then I received information about my birth parents. I got butterflies in my stomach when I saw the letter in the mailbox. It had also been awhile since I’d really thought about what it means to be adopted.

Getting that information: height, weight, and characteristics of the people whose genes I share, made me aware of a piece I didn't know had been missing.

Looking Back — Adoption in BC. The Last Decade.

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

by Harriet Fancott

As the millenium comes to a close, we thought a recap of the most important changes in adoption over that period would be fitting. For simplicity, however, we decided to stick to the last decade.

The Adoption Act: The biggest catalyst for change within the BC adoption community over the last decade came with the new Adoption Act, which was introduced in 1994 and came into force Nov 4, 1996. The 1994 Act replaced the 1957 Act and was hailed as one of the most progressive in North America.

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