Child welfare

How to apply for a BCeID: Your ticket to the Adopt BC Kids process

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Last year, the Ministry of Children and Family Development transitioned to an online adoption application process called Adopt BC Kids. To access the new system, prospective adoptive parents must sign up for a special type of identification called a BC Electronic ID (BCeID). A BCeID provides secure access to online government services like Adopt BC Kids. Here’s what you need to do to get one.

Canadians and adoption: New study reveals what we really think

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

In 2017, the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption released a ground-breaking new study of Canadian attitudes and behaviours towards adoption and foster care. The comprehensive document is packed with research and insights, but since it’s also almost 80 pages long, we’ve put together this brief overview of its key findings.

Camp Moomba: A camp that changes lives

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Each year, approximately 15 of Moomba’s 40 campers are adoptees or foster kids!

Summer camp, with a twist

Camp Moomba’s motto is “Friends together having fun.” Campers enjoy all the classic activities that make sleep-away camps magical, from rock climbing and sailing to campfires and arts and crafts. They also bond over something unique. The camp is run by YouthCO HIV & Hep C Society, and each Moomba camper either lives with HIV or has a family member who does.

Grandmother to guardian

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

A growing number of grandparents in BC are living with and raising their grandchildren. in this story, a grandmother shares her very personal experience with becoming the legal guardian of her daughter's child. To protect the privacy of her daughter and grandchild, names have been redacted. 

Stuck in the system

I remember getting the call from the Ministry of Children and Family Development (MCFD) like it was yesterday. It was Friday, December 30, 2016, at 9 am. A clear, cool day. 

Guardianship: A different option for permanency

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Guardianship is a court process based on the Family Law Act that offers a way for anyone to create permanency for a child by becoming their guardian. This article explores its many similarities to adoption, and its key differences. 

What is guardianship? 

Becoming a guardian means that you are responsible for all the decisions, care, supervision, and day-to-day decisions for a child. When parents are absent or unable to raise their children, other parents, family members, or grandparents often step in to help. 

Caring for Indigenous families

Source: 
Focus on Adoption Magazine

The Indigenous Perspectives Society (IPS), formerly Caring for First Nations Children Society, is a registered charitable non-profit founded in 1994. IPS has played a significant role in the delivery of training and policy development in the Indigenous child welfare field. We interviewed IPS staff about their recent move into providing support and training to caregivers of Indigenous children who are in foster care.

Be ready to support LGBTQ youth

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

For many youth, foster and adoptive homes can be safe places for care and support when the biological family does not provide appropriate care. Unfortunately, many lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth are placed in foster homes where their caretakers do not understand or accept these youth because of their gender or sexual orientation.

Early adversity and mental health

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

This article was originally published on the Adoption Council of Ontario’s blog for Bell Let’s Talk day (a social media campaign that encourages Canadians to talk openly about mental health). We were inspired by Kathy’s insight into the connection between early trauma and mental illness in adoptees, and by her ideas on how to help hurt kids heal.

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