Infant adoption

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The rollercoaster ride of adoption

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Our adoption journey started in 1998. We chose domestic adoption for a number of reasons, including wanting a newborn, and the possibility of openness with a birth family. We were prepared to wait, knowing we had no control over when, or even if, we would be chosen.

We did all the paperwork and education sessions, and by March 1999, our homestudy was ready. We jumped into the pool of waiting families and prepared to wait.

Living openness: Naming Victor

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

V is for Victor... or is it?

It was a sparkling May bursting with new life, and we were going to be parents in two months. We didn’t have a crib,  bottles, formula, diapers or onesies, but my husband Kevin and I had a name. Our son would be named Victor.

Mother's Day and the adoptive Mom

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Mother’s Day brings to mind fresh flowers, blueberry pancakes and homemade cards. It’s a day to be spoiled and fêted by family. But for me, an adoptive mother, it’s never as simple as the Hallmark holiday it’s touted to be.

Don’t get me wrong: I feel deep joy in my role as mom to my two-and-a-half-year-old son, and I marvel at his giddy joie de vivre. But the way I arrived at motherhood will always be bittersweet. In order for me to become a mom, another mother had to lose a child.

Adoption: Happily ever after - almost

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

As a mother of two adopted adult children, I had been going to the Forget Me Not Family Society (FMNFS) meetings in Cloverdale for over a year, and I thought I knew about Moms (birthmoms) and adoptees. My sister Bernadette was forced to give her baby to what society told her was a “better family” because she was given no support to keep her precious little newborn.

Adoption against all the odds

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

The following story is far from typical—most BC families that adopt from the US have a much easier experience. This story speaks to the immense strength of the desire to become parents. Despite the enormous difficulty of their journey, the couple we feature here persevered. That is a characteristic of many adoptive families—it is a quality that brings untold numbers of parents and children together.

Deciding to start a family took Jane Bartlett and Linda Coe (names have been changed) on one of the most difficult adoption journeys imaginable.

Danger of secrets

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

A mom discovers that her child's birth sister has no idea that they are siblings--now what does she do?

My daughter Lucy is the second child in her biological family. Her older sister Kate was adopted at birth by a very loving couple. When they were asked if they would adopt Lucy, Kate was already 9-years-old and was the oldest of four children. Though I’m sure the decision was difficult, ultimately Kate’s parents were not in a position to parent Lucy. As fate would have it, the next call came to us and Lucy became our daughter.

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