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Be prepared! Kids' health and international adoption

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Before you travel

  • Know the country you would like to adopt a child from and read up on the potential medical issues your child may have.
  • Before travelling, get your own vaccinations up-to-date by making a visit to your local travel clinic (if you don't know your local travel clinic, your local health unit should have a list).
  • Make an appointment with your doctor to alert them to the fact that you will be bringing a child home and some of the medical issues the child may have.
  • Buy plenty of medical supplies to take with you (see sidebar on right).

Return to Russia truly complete family

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

In 1996 we adopted our first daughter, Oksana, from Novosibirsk, Russia; she was two years old. When we returned to Canada, we had our documents translated and found a limited amount of birth family information. What we read piqued our interest and we contacted the authorities in Novosibirsk asking for more information. They declined our request.

Diary of an Intercountry Adoptive Mom series

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

In this five-part series, we present the diary of Mary Ella, an intercoutry adoptive mom. She shares the journey she and her husband, Wayne, took to Korea to meet their long-awaited daughter, Leelee.

  1. Day 1 and 2
  2. Day 3 and 4
  3. Day 5
  4. Day 5 continued, and Day 6
  5. Day 6 continued, Day 7, and one final entry

Want to read more? Subscribe to Focus on Adoption magazine!

 

 

My transition from foster care into an adoptive home

Source: 
Speak-Out Youth Newsletter #2

Transitioning can be different for every person. For my brother and I it was a different experience for the both of us...

I was not completely ready for the transition and had run away for a few days to, in a way, help clear my mind. My brother on the other hand went easily. Once we were at the house everything went well. The first summer went really well; we had lots of fun and had got to know each other well. Once school started there were a few challenges.

Perspectives: Adoption in Alberta

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Adoption across the Rockies

At any given time last year, there were about 5,300 children and youth in permanent government care in Alberta. In the same year, 449 of these children found a loving and permanent home. Alberta children are almost always placed with Alberta families in order to keep them connected to extended family, culture, community, and resources.

Perspectives: Inuit custom adoption

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

In our “Perspectives” series, we examine adoption in other places, other cultures, and other times. By widening our lens, we hope to open our minds and develop a deeper understanding of ourselves, each other, and our roles in the world of adoption. Would you like to write about adoption from a historical or cultural perspective? Contact us at editor@bcadoption.com.

A waiting parent's plea

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Inspiration from Alberta

For 32 years, Alberta has profiled children in need of adoption on their weekly Wednesday’s Child TV program (see page 10 for more on adoption in Alberta). For 12 years, the province has also successfully profiled “harder to place” children on a public website. These campaigns regularly generate new applications from potential parents who go on to be matched with waiting children. In fact, 70% of children profiled this way are matched with parents. What’s the secret to this success?

Legal matters: Considering birth fathers

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

“We are planning to adopt a baby and have heard stories about birth fathers coming forward at the last minute to disrupt adoptions. What is the situation if this happens?”

As with all questions involving the law, an accurate answer begins with, “it depends.” The first thing it depends on is where the child (and birth father) reside. Different countries, and even different provinces or states, have differing laws and procedures. For the purpose of this response, I will assume all parties live in BC.

Choosing adoption

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

For years, I tried to avoid even considering adoption. The idea of being put with people I didn’t know anything about and hadn’t even seen before was a little scary. I’d mostly lived with my great-grandma my whole life. That felt like home to me, and I didn’t want to leave. Unfortunately, my grandma’s age and health problems were getting bad and she wasn’t able to continue taking care of me. I had nowhere to turn. Adoption became the best option for me. Deciding on adoption was very scary, and I felt like I was risking my future.

Emerging ideas around adoption

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

I attended the North American Council on Adoptable Children Conference in Los Angles in July 2015 with the intention of checking facts for my new book on adoptive parenting, discovering new ideas, and meeting wonderful people. I accomplished all three goals and found the whole experience exhilarating. There is amazing energy when more than 900 dedicated people meet and exchange ideas. The conference was full of inspiring sessions.

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