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Adoption satisfaction survey

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Just over 650 people took part in BC's first adoption satisfaction survey. TWI Surveys, a Canada-wide, independent research and strategy development company, designed and hosted the survey which was conducted in September 2009.

Overall, the results were positive, but improvements can be made.

Because of the large number of responses to our survey, the results are extremely reliable. As well as areas for improvement, there is lots of good news.

Everyone has a story: Meet the Vaillancourts

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

My first encounter with the idea of children in care who needed families was during a church service as a little girl.

The speaker shared unsettling statistics about kids who age out of care and end up incarcerated, homeless, or worse; kids who are separated from their siblings; and young adults who have no place to spend the holidays or summer vacation. I suppose it all resonated with me because I came from a family of five siblings, and I couldn’t imagine my life without them. At that church service I made up my mind that I wanted to adopt older kids one day.

Breaking the language barrier

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

For many internationally adopted children, a part of adjusting to their new home will include learning to hear the sounds of English. They will then need to learn how to move their lips, tongue, and jaw to produce these sounds, and then put words together.

Language learning

Encourage language learning by creating fun  activities like Peek-a-Boo, singing songs, or other age-appropriate games.

Toddlers

Inside Aboriginal adoption in BC

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

The importance of cultural connections

In a previous article, I wrote about the Exceptions Committee in the Ministry of Children and Family Development (MCFD). The article was prompted by a list of questions that the Adoptive Families Association of BC had gathered from their membership. There were additional questions related to Aboriginal adoption in BC that I will endeavor to answer in this follow-up article.

When the wait to adopt seems too long

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

"We've been waiting for a local infant proposal for two long years. Is there anything we can do?"

It's time for you to review your homestudy and your options. Re-read your homestudy to be sure that it still reflects your family situation. Have there been any changes over the last two years that may need to be added? After reviewing your homestudy, phone your agency or social worker to make an appointment to discuss your options.

A change of heart - Birth parent revocation

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

These stories illustrate the power of the elemental need to parent, the ability to mourn but not blame, the uniqueness of every adoption, and what an agonizing decision adoption can be for birth parents.

In BC, birth mothers have 30 days form the time their child is born to change their minds and decide to parent their child. Usually those 30 days pass by, albeit slowly, and the adoptive parents can breathe a sigh of relief. For others, it's not quite so simple.

Everyone has a story: Meet the Eislers

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Within our first year of being married, my husband and I knew that building our family may come by way of adoption.

I suffered from debilitating but undiagnosed pain, and doctors raised the possibility of a hysterectomy. It took another 14 years of pain and failed attempts to conceive before I found a doctor who finally diagnosed me with endometriosis.

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