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Unconditional Commitment: The Only Love That Matters To Teens

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Having directed both foster care and adoption programs that place teenagers into permanent families, and then having founded an agency that places teenagers into permanent families, I often get asked, “What kind of people will offer their home permanently to a teenager?” My answer is always the same, “Any and all kinds of people who, after a good preparation experience, are willing to unconditionally commit themselves to a child no matter what behavior that child might ultimately exhibit.” Teenagers need, first and foremost, at least one adult who will unconditionally commit to and claim th

Father's fears quickly resolved after adoption

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

David Murphy of Abbotsford, is brimming with family pride. There’s him, his wife Nikki, two-year-old Cody, the dog and two cats. Children were always going to be part of the Murphy family—there was no doubt about it. David recalls that on their honeymoon Nikki talked about starting a family. "I wanted to wait a year or so. But five years later we had still been unable to conceive a child."

When the Wait Seems Too Long

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Q: I am 37 and my husband is 47.  We have been waiting for a local infant proposal for two years and have not been chosen by birth parents. How much longer should we wait before we pursue other options or give up altogether?

A: The waiting is a difficult part of the adoption process. Waiting for a domestic adoption can be even harder because there is no set time frame or predictability for when, or if, birth parents may consider your homestudy.

Birth father disruptions

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

We are planning to adopt a baby and have heard stories about birth fathers coming forward at the last minute, to disrupt adoptions. What is the situation if this happens?
As with all questions involving the law, an accurate answer begins with, “it depends.” The first thing it depends on is where the child (and birth father) reside. Different countries, and even different provinces or states, have differing laws and procedures. For the purpose of this response, I will assume all parties live in BC.

When Birth Parents Change Their Minds

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Though they are rare, and most adoptions go through seamlessly, revocations by birth parents happen.

In BC, birth parents have 30 days from the time their child is born to change their minds and decide to parent their child.

Usually those 30 days pass by, albeit slowly, and the parents can breathe a sigh of relief. For others, it’s not quite so simple.

Looking Back — Adoption in BC. The Last Decade.

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

by Harriet Fancott

As the millenium comes to a close, we thought a recap of the most important changes in adoption over that period would be fitting. For simplicity, however, we decided to stick to the last decade.

The Adoption Act: The biggest catalyst for change within the BC adoption community over the last decade came with the new Adoption Act, which was introduced in 1994 and came into force Nov 4, 1996. The 1994 Act replaced the 1957 Act and was hailed as one of the most progressive in North America.

The Complexity of Adoption Ethics

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

In this discussion paper, I hope to open a door for reflection and discussion within the adoption community, meaning adoption agencies, support services, and adoptive and prospective adoptive parents. It is time to examine our underlying values and biases in adoption, and address how the adoptive system advantages some, while disadvantaging others.

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