Articles

AddToAny

Share

Are you struggling with openness? Do you wish you could find out how someone else dealt with food and eating issues? Do you need to know more about making a cultural plan for your child? Our searchable articles database is a vast collection of outstanding adoption articles, offering expert opinion, real-life stories, and relevant articles on a huge range of adoption issues. 

Search by topic and audience, or simply browse the database for something inspiring! Remember to check back regularly, as we are always adding new content.  

Articles by series:

 

Search for Articles

Source: Focus on Adoption magazine
Like many couples, John Calhoun and Carly Bates found their way to adoption after experiencing infertility.It wasn’t an out-of-left-field choice for them, though. Carly says she told John on their first date that she wanted to adopt. It just took them a few years to get there. They knew they wanted to experience what it was like to  parent a newborn, so they chose to pursue local infant adoption through an agency. Just four months after
Source: Focus on Adoption magazine
At the beginning of our adoption, emotions were high, birth family visits were frequent, and roles were unclear. Well-meaning friends and family members suggested that it might just be “a whole lot easier if our adoption was closed.” We could bond with our baby without interference, and the birth parents could “get on with their lives.”We also knew other adoptive parents who were quietly relieved that they would never have to meet the birth
Source: Focus on Adoption magazine
Hn’ skʷést Npànkìtc a (My traditional name is Npànkìtc a) and my English name is Loren Sahara. Nłeʔkepmxkn Scw̓éxmxkn ncéweʔ (I am from the Nłeʔkepmx Nation – people of the creeks).As an Indigenous person, a Caring for First Nations Children Society (CFNCS) instructor, and an adoptive parent, I have  been witness to a powerful journey of discovery in relation to adopting Indigenous children and the various struggles and triumphs that come
Source: Focus on Adoption magazine
What a difference three years can make.We recently attended an interracial adoptive families get together. It is a valuable resource for all of us. Our daughter gets to see other families that look like ours, and my wife and I get to hear other experiences that help us realize we’re not doing that badly.We were asked if our daughter had experienced any trauma and the immediate response was “no”. But then thinking about it, there certainly has
Source: Focus on Adoption magazine
Colleen and her husband of 17 years, Jussi, live on Vancouver Island. Colleen, a former foster parent for over 20 years, also has three grown children and three grandkids. Her oldest daughter was a neighborhood kid that came for the weekend and stayed for 28 years, according to Colleen. “We have no legal paperwork, but she’s not any less ours,” she adds.Colleen and Jussi considered adoption for over a decade until, as empty-nesters, the couple
Source: Focus on Adoption magazine
Dear People Who Have, or May, Come Into Contact with My Daughter,Thank you so much for your interest in my daughter’s hair. Yes, it is beautiful, and we both appreciate your compliments. Yes, she’s very patient and has no problem sitting to have her hair done. She’s been getting her hair done since she was very small and knows of nothing else; her hair regime is a fact of life, and she doesn’t see it as the burden that you do. Nor do I.While
Source: Focus on Adoption magazine
1. Adoption is different in personAs the former editor of Focus on Adoption, I attended conferences, transracial adoptee panels, and attachment workshops. I worked closely with adoptive parents and adoptees. I listened and wrote their stories. I thought I knew everything there was to know about adoption. That was before we adopted our son, Theo, at birth in an open adoption. That’s when the full force of living adoption hit me. Nothing could
Source: Focus on Adoption magazine
Since Harriet Fancott adopted a baby last year, she's had time to reflect on what, despite all her preparation, she wasn't prepared for.Adoption is parentingI wish I’d known more about the realities of parenting a newborn baby before adopting. We were so focused on the details and issues surrounding adoption that the minutiae and stress of parenting came as a real shock. I was well-versed in transracial issues, openness, the legal process, and
Source: Focus on Adoption magazine
Cyberspace offers the adoption community both opportunities and risks--we need to prepare for both.Growing numbers of adoptive parents and adoptees use social networking to talk, to meet, to share, to find, and to learn.Thanks to social networking we are now all potential publishers—we can tell our stories, we can rant, we can chronicle, we can learn. Not only is our potential audience massive, what we write can be widely shared and distributed
Source: Focus on Adoption magazine
Am I ready to adopt?Before you decide, consider the following questions:Am I ready to love a child to whom I have not given birth?Have I stopped fertility treatment and committed to adoption?Am I comfortable accepting the fact that the birth family exists and will be important to the child, whether I know them or not?Am I prepared to meet the birth family and have some form of communication with them for my child’s sake?Will I support my child

Pages