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Are you struggling with openness? Do you wish you could find out how someone else dealt with food and eating issues? Do you need to know more about making a cultural plan for your child? Our searchable articles database is a vast collection of outstanding adoption articles, offering expert opinion, real-life stories, and relevant articles on a huge range of adoption issues. 

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When you decided to adopt a child as a single person, you bravely took on the  full responsibility for raising your child on your own. You also chose to take on the extra issues of transracial adoption because you are a single parent and because you and your child are obviously not of the same ethnic or racial background, you get to face the task of meeting curious people’s challenges about whether or not you and your child are a
Source: Focus on Adoption magazine
In the fourth of our series, we present the edited diary of Mary Ella, who is in Korea with her husband Wayne, only hours away from taking charge of their long-awaited daughter, Hee Young (Leelee).Day #5, June 28, continued.Mrs. Kang had asked us earlier when we wanted to take Hee Young, and we told her as soon as possible. Though, as much as I wanted her with us today, I felt it would be best to let her have one more night as a family with
Source: Focus on Adoption magazine
Andrew Martindale, an adoptive parent, and assistant professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia, explains that the concept of race is man-made and, though it holds enormous power, has no biological basis.The history of race relations makes transracial adoptions deeply personal, and, at times, very public statements of reconciliation. What do we say to our children, ourselves and others about the nature and
Source: Focus on Adoption magazine
Generally, grown men shouldn’t cry in public. Particularly not in Tim Hortons on a Friday night. But here I am, holding back tears with my laptop open and my coffee cooling. Five minutes ago I was typing away happily, and now, here I am, writing this.What triggered the tears? It isn’t the quality of Tim’s coffee—I’m not really that sophisticated when it comes to coffee. It could be that I’m alone in a cheap coffee shop on a Friday night— sad,
Source: Focus on Adoption magazine
Incorporating cultural traditions in your new familyAdopting a child is a time to celebrate. But beyond the initial celebration of the arrival of your new child, how can you incorporate new traditions and celebrations into your life? If your child has another country or culture in their background, it is important to share the learning experience of exploring their culture with them, through their own eyes. These experiences provide adopted
Source: Focus on Adoption magazine
Tell me about your family.After 10 years of infertility, my partner and I decided to adopt a child. The race of the child was not an issue for us, we simply wanted to be parents. Looking back on it, I admit that we were naive.We have two sons - *Jake 12, and *Matt 10. They have the same birth mother—with whom we enjoy a very open relationship. Jake’s adoption happened much more quickly than we expected. Six weeks after our homestudy was
Source: Focus on Adoption magazine
Once we decided that we’d create our family through adoption, we were overwhelmed with the many avenues we could pursue. It was after seeing a Christmas picture of the ACAN group, that we finally decided to adopt internationally, with the Open Door Agency in Georgia. The journey that led us to become a multiracial family had begun.Once the process was underway, we read books to familiarize ourselves with the issues of white parents raising
Source: Focus on Adoption magazine
Do adoptive parents' conceptions of race and racial identity change after adoption? Raising a child of a different race than yours probably means that you’ve discussed comeback lines for all those unwanted grocery store comments with other adoptive parents.If you’re like us, you’ve probably felt at a loss for words at times and worried how some of these misconceptions and misguided views might affect your children who are often standing next to
Source: Focus on Adoption magazine
Loving our children has been easy. As transracial adoptive parents, however, it has been much more difficult to develop strategies for dealing with individual and institutional racism.In our experience, the best lessons we can offer are those that teach our children to externalize racism and assure them we will always be there for them.Externalizing racismBecause my husband and I do not share our children’s racial or cultural backgrounds, we
Source: Focus on Adoption magazine
Ola Zuri, a transracial adoptee, has written a children’s book Why Can’t You Look Like Me? Siobhan Rowe interviewed Ola about her experience growing up and what she’d like parents who adopt a child of a different ethnicity to know.Why did you write the book?The inspiration (this is one of a series of books) stems from my own experience and from talking to adoptees, adoptive parents, and birth parents. Throughout my life I’ve had to answer so

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