Native American Transracial Adoptees Tell Their Stories

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Native American Transracial Adoptees Tell Their Stories presents twenty interviews with Native American adoptees raised in non-Native homes. Through the in-depth interviews they conduct with each participant, the authors explore complex questions of cultural identity formation. The participants of the study represent a range of positive and negative experiences of transracial adoption. Regardless of their personal experiences, however, all twenty respondents indicate that they are supporters of the Indian Child Welfare Act and that they believe that Native children should be raised in Native households whenever possible. However, eighteen of the twenty respondents concede that non-Native families can raise Native children to be happy, healthy, well-adjusted adults. Through the interviews, Simon and Hernandez allow readers to better understand the different experiences of Native American adoptees.

Jen's Pick: This book presents 20 interviews with Native American adoptees raised in non-Native American homes. Through their stories, the authors explore the complex questions of cultural identity and the beliefs that govern the placement, or not, of Native children in non-Native homes. By examining the lived experience of Native American adoptees, the reader gains a deeper understanding of the positive and negative impacts of transracial adoption.

Native American Transracial Adoptees Tell Their Stories

Author: 
Simon, Rita J and Hernandez, Sarah
Media Type: 
Location ID: 
D.0 N38 S56 2008 (B)
Audience: