Attachment

AddToAny

Share

Chosen ones

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Decades ago, when my parents found out they couldn’t have children, adoption was less complex than it is now.

With more adoptable infants available in the region, they were able to have their “dream” family of one boy and one girl relatively quickly. My brother was adopted first in the mid 1960s, and I followed a little less than four years later. The application for my adoption included a photo of my dad, my mom, and my brother, Brent, in matching shirts hand-made by my mom.

What is family?

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Family means many things. It can mean biological, foster, adoptive, and/or honorary.

The Vanier Institute of the Family defines family as “any combination of two or more persons who are bound  together over time by ties of mutual consent, birth and/or adoption or placement and who, together, assume responsibilities for the functions of the family.”

Goodnight Mommy

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

I knock gently on my son’s door. No answer. I open the door, and peer in. I can just make out the sleeping body, huddled underneath a pile of blankets.

I go into the room, peel back the covers, and stroke my finger along his cheek. “10 more minutes,” he says.

“OK,” I say, turning to leave the room.

“No, in your bed.”

He gets out of his bed and, still half asleep, walks across the hall to my room. He crawls under my duvet  and snuggles in.

Love me, feed me: part two

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Most folks who work with kids and food begin with a question: “What to feed?”

There are countless articles and books about how to disguise veggies or sneak in more protein. But without steps one and two in place (the “how” of feeding, or the “feeding relationship”–see “Love Me, Feed Me” part one), step three is even more of a struggle. The key to improving what kids eat boils down to how they are being fed.

Attachment-based Strategic Parenting

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Attachment-based strategic parenting works with parents to develop a parent-child relationship based on empathy,  understanding, acceptance, genuineness, and playfulness.

It helps parents increase their self-confidence and feelings of warmth towards their child, and reduces parenting stress. It improves the family’s coping skills and psychosocial adjustment, and increases their ability to have fun and enjoy each  other.

Extreme parenting: Be a safe and predictable harbour

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Claire's 10-year-old son was adopted from a Russian orphanage when he was 19 months old. Her other son, Ethan, joined their family just over a year ago, when he was seven. Ethan was born in Canada and entered government care at age two. In this 12-part series, Claire shares the "fast and furious learning" that she and her family experienced when they adopted an older child.

The ugly truth is that I thought I was going to lose my mind in the first six months after Ethan joined our family.

Love me, feed me: part one

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Feeding and attachment

The attachment cycle is fulfilled by meeting a child’s physical and emotional needs—feeling hunger, needing attention, being wet or cold—over and over again. Feeding is one of the most reliable and obvious opportunities to help a child feel safe and cared for, and to build trust, whether you have brought home an infant or an older child.

Extreme parenting: Never take anything personally

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Claire's 10-year-old son was adopted from a Russian orphanage when he was 19 months old. Her other son, Ethan, joined their family just over a year ago, when he was seven. Ethan was born in Canada and entered government care at age two. All names are pseudonyms. In this 12-part series, Claire shares the "fast and furious learning" that she and her family experienced when they adopted an older child.

Extreme parenting: No apologies

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Meet Claire, an adoptive mom of two boys, who shares the “fast and furious learning” that she and her family experiences when they adopt an older child. Claire's 10-year-old son was adopted from a Russian orphanage when he was 19 months old. Her other son, Ethan, joined their family just over a year ago, when he was 7. Ethan was born in Canada and entered government care at age two. Read on for Claire’s lessons in extreme parenting.

Extreme parenting: Love is a decision

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Claire's 10-year-old son was adopted from a Russian orphanage when he was 19 months old. Her other son, Ethan, joined their family just over a year ago, when he was 7. Ethan was born in Canada and at the age of 2 was taken into government care, where he remembers at least three sets of foster parents over five years and acquired two behavioural designations – reactive attachment disorder and severe adjustment disorder. Read on for Claire’s lessons in extreme parenting.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Attachment