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Everyone has a story: Meet the Keno family

Heather always knew she would adopt. She grew up in a busy household with seven other siblings, five of them adopted. At 26 she took the plunge to adopt as a single and has never looked back. Now, with two adopted sons with Down Syndrome, Heather lives a full life. Here, we get a glimpse into her life, and she shares her experience with the adoption process, as well as some words of wisdom. 

Everyone has a story: Meet the Massick-Phillips family

Heather Massick (née Phillips) describes her family as “a large, blended, adopted/ foster family with two parents.” Heather had two children through adoption and one foster child when she met her husband, Glen. Glen has three children from a previous relationship, so they became a six-kid household. Almost two years into their relationship, Heather was approached by the birth parents of the two she had already adopted regarding permanency planning for the two younger siblings. Heather and Glen both said yes, which brought them up to eight children.

Adopt BC Kids 2019 stats

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Here are some fast facts and information about adoption in BC. All numbers supplied by the Ministry of Children and Family Development (MCFD), current as of November 2019.

Families in BC adopted 1,400 kids from government care in the past five years, but there are many more children and youth who are still waiting.

Racism and your child

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

When kids experience racism, what can their parents do? Here are some resources and tips from an experienced adoptive parent.

Editor’s note: Some of these tips are aimed specifically at white parents. AFABC recognizes that adoptive families are incredibly diverse, and that transracial adoptive families include parents from all backgrounds, heritages, and experiences, including parents of colour who have firsthand experience with racism.

Celebrating 25 years of Harambee Cultural Society

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

The purpose of the Harambee Cultural Society is to celebrate the value of transracial families and mitigate the challenges faced by transracially adopted children. In 2020 Harambee will celebrate their 25th anniversary, so we touched base with them to find out how Harambee has grown and changed over the last quarter-century. All photos courtesy the Harambee Cultural Society, by jenniferarmstrongphotography.com

Diary of an Adoptive Mom series

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Here are some of the articles from our long-running Diary of an Adoptive Mom series. This adoptive mother shares her experiences and secret thoughts of raising three children. This series ran from 2006 to 2010.

Note: Diary entries #1 to #7 are unavailable 

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