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Answering your child’s questions about adoption

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

In her workshop "Answering Your Child’s Questions about Adoption," Lois Melina stressed that adoptive parents must commit to speaking openly with their children. Adoption is a significant event in the lives of families and connects them through shared memories and histories.

Melina also emphasized that adoptive children deserve to hear about their backgrounds in a loving way. This reduces feelings of abandonment or rejection. She cautioned that if parents try to hide the facts, their children are likely to hear them from someone else.

Adoption reversal and revocation

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Adoption reversal and revocation strikes fear in the hearts of adopting parents. Under section 19 of the Adoption Act, "a birth mother may revoke her consent within 30 days of the child's birth, even though the child has been placed for adoption during that period." In a reversal, consents have not been signed; in revocation, consents have been signed. In most cases the child was living in the adoptive home. Under the old Act, there was no revocation period.

Embracing the twin roles of love and loss

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Talking about grief and loss is a difficult conversation for adoptive parents to have with each other and with children. For my family, adoption is neither a win-win-win nor a lose-lose-lose situation, but rather it is both. Together the losses inherent in the adoption process and the deep love we share bind our family together. After eight years and lots of difficult work acknowledging my own losses, I am more able to embrace the role that both loss and love play in our family.

Can a birth father override a birth mother's wishes in BC?

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

An adoptive family was ordered to give up their 10-month baby girl, adopted at 11 days old, when a birthfather applied for custody of the child. The ruling was later overturned. In light of this case, we have chosed to reprint various clarifications on the legal rights of birth fathers and adoptive families. To put things in perspective, less than one per cent of adoptions are contested by birth fathers.

Diarrhea in internationally adopted children

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Some people consider diarrhea a right of passage. After all, almost all children around the world have been infected with diarrhea by age two.

Diarrhea: What it is
Diarrhea describes an increase in the frequency, fluidity, and volume of bowel movements (BMs). This assumes a change in the previous pattern, which is often difficult to know in newly adopted children. All children, like all adults, have their own rhythm of BMs. Some children have BMs several times a day, while others have BMs every few days.

Romanian adoption research

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

These are the findings of Dr. Elinor Ames' research on the Development of Romanian Children Adopted to Canada. In 1990, Dr. Ames, an adoptive parent and professor of developmental psychology at BC's Simon Fraser University, began her research on the effects of institutionalization on children adopted to BC from Romanian orphanages. That same year, 1013 children were adopted from Romania to Canada, the single largest influx of intercountry adoptions in Canadian history.

Know the Risks: Adopting an Institutionalized Child

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

by Dana E. Johnson

The most difficult area in adoption medicine is predicting the needs of children adopted from orphanages. We are only beginning to understand how these kids are doing. Studies have been too few to say with certainty what percentage is normal (even if we could define "normal"). Also, the situation changes with time. Some children resolve problems, while others begin to exhibit them as the years pass. Because studies only deal with a two-to-five-year period after adoption, no one can speculate on long-term issues.

Tips for Families Considering NAS or Alcohol-Affected Babies

Source: 
Special Needs Database
  1. Work with informed professionals in adoption agencies that the community regards as offering quality adoption services.
  2. Take the time to explore your own feelings about substance abuse in general and your experiences with substance abuse—in your own personal background, with family and friends, and in the work place.
  3. Take the time to explore your own feelings

Drug-exposed kids thrive in adoptive homes

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

A summary from Dr Jill Waterman's session at the North American Council on Adoptable Children Conference in Pasadena, July 28 - August 1, 1999, on outcomes for adopted children affected by drugs. Waterman is the head of Clinical Psychology at UCLA and co-instigator on the TIES Adoption Project in LA. TIES provides Training, Intervention, Education, and Services to support the adoption of children who were prenatally exposed to alcohol and/or other drugs.

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