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Adopting orphans in times of disaster or war

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

For many Canadians the horrific images from the December 2004 Tsunami in South Asia, inspired the desire to adopt an orphaned child.

While these desires are normal, there are compelling reasons why adoption from war torn or disaster struck nations is strongly discouraged.

The United Nations (UN), stands strongly against any immediate adoptions in such situations and states; “Special care must be taken to prevent the hasty placement of children outside their own country.”

Birth father disruptions

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

We are planning to adopt a baby and have heard stories about birth fathers coming forward at the last minute, to disrupt adoptions. What is the situation if this happens?
As with all questions involving the law, an accurate answer begins with, “it depends.” The first thing it depends on is where the child (and birth father) reside. Different countries, and even different provinces or states, have differing laws and procedures. For the purpose of this response, I will assume all parties live in BC.

When the Child Wants to Be the Parent

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Our adoption story started in the fall of 1984 when I experienced a near fatal health emergency as a result of a genetic illness. My wife and I decided not to have biological children, as there was a strong possibility that my illness would be passed onto our children. We were aware of adoption, but never considered it seriously — we’d heard that it could take years and years.

When Adopted Toddlers Reject Their Parents

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

More and more adopted children are arriving home between the ages of one and three, and many of these toddlers have been wrenched from a familiar setting, are grieving the loss of a known caregiver, have experienced neglect or other forms of abuse, and/or have experienced multiple disruptions in their short lives. Toddlers who have resided in orphanages have typically experienced both environmental impoverishment and extremely inadequate care.

Beyond sexual abuse: Families can promote healing

Source: 
Beyond Sexual Abuse: The Healing Power of Adoptive Families

Even if sexual abuse is not disclosed in a child’s history, foster and adoptive parents must be prepared to deal with issues of sexuality and sexual abuse.

Was My Child Abused?
If your child’s worker does not mention sexual abuse, and records say nothing, did your child escape this form of abuse? Maybe. Maybe not. Sexual abuse often goes unnoticed, and unrecorded, and often children are reluctant to talk about abuse, and few abusers confess to their crimes.

Beyond the books - Blindsided by attachment

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Aleisha and Garry Jenkins adopted their first child, Sadie, as a newborn from the US. Two years later, they approached the Ministry of Children and Family Development (MCFD), hoping to adopt two older children. They were surprised when the MCFD proposed a sibling group of two: Elliot, a little boy of 18 months, and his sister, Maya, three years old. Though they didn’t expect such young children, the couple pursued the adoption.

Adoption from an adoptee's perspective

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

I was adopted at birth, 22 years ago, but I've never felt like anything was missing from my life. Then I received information about my birth parents. I got butterflies in my stomach when I saw the letter in the mailbox. It had also been awhile since I’d really thought about what it means to be adopted.

Getting that information: height, weight, and characteristics of the people whose genes I share, made me aware of a piece I didn't know had been missing.

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