Health

Circles of relationship: Teaching social distance

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

In part one (see: Boundaries: Keeping families safe), we talked about the need to make our expectations for behaviours explicit to children who are new to our families. We also discussed how some children, especially those from foster or institutional care, may have had multiple caregivers, all or some of whom may have been relative strangers. It is not surprising that such children may seek affection indiscriminately from adults or children they have just met.

Lice

Source: 
AFABC Special Needs Database

Definition
Lice (plural) or louse (singular) are tiny parasitic insects. There are three different kinds, head lice, body lice, and pubic lice. They exist on the surface of the skin clinging to hair strands or fibres. Lice, like mosquitoes, often carry diseases and can transmit them to the host’s body.

Juvenile Diabetes

Source: 
AFABC Special Needs Database

Definition
Diabetes is a long-life disease marked by elevated levels of sugar in the blood. It can be caused by too little insulin (a chemical produced by the pancreas to regulate blood sugar), resistance to insulin, or both. There are three major types of diabetes:

Type 1 diabetes: is usually diagnosed in childhood. The body makes little or no insulin, and daily injections of insulin are required to sustain life. Without proper daily management, medical emergencies can arise.

Intestinal parasites

Source: 
AFABC Special Needs Database

Definition
A parasitic infection of the intestinal area in which the invading parasite lives in and survives off the host’s body. The parasite will take what it needs with no regard to the host, which results in illness or at least discomfort for most people.   

Institutionalization

Source: 
AFABC Special Needs Database

Definition
The placement of a child in an institution, such as an orphanage or group home, usually characterized by a large number of children and few caregivers. Unfortunately there is commonly a lack of financial resources, and caregivers, which leads to a number of problems for the children in their care.

Causes
A lack of staff, resources, and money creates a situation in which the children do not receive the type of care they need to thrive.

Hydrocephalus

Source: 
AFABC Special Needs Database

Definition:
Hydrocephalus comes from the Greek "hydro" (that means water) and "cephalus" (that means head). Hydrocephalus is an abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), within cavities called ventricles, inside the brain.

CSF is formed in a region of the brain known as the choroids plexus. CSF usually circulates through the ventricles of the brain, and also flows around the outside of the brain and through the spinal canal.

HIV

Source: 
AFABC Special Needs Database

Definition
Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a viral infection that can gradually destroys the immune system if left untreated. With Anti Retroviral Drugs (ARV's), the progression of HIV can be stopped and prevent Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), the final and most serious stage of HIV, which causes severe damage to the immune system. With proper care and treatment, an individual can live a full and healthy life, with undetectable viral loads of HIV.

Hepatitis C Virus

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Definition
Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) is a viral infection transmitted through blood, which focuses its attack on the body’s liver.

Causes
The virus is transmittable only through direct infection of blood. This includes blood transfusions done before 1990 and contaminated needles (injections, tattoos, piercing, drugs). There is a very small chance of the disease being transmitted through sex or giving birth as well. However, the disease is not transmittable through coughing, sneezing, physical contact, saliva, or insect bites.

Hepatitis B Virus

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Definition
Hepatitis B is one of the most common virus in the world.  It is a disease which attacks and inflames the liver.  It is transmitted directly through blood and other infected bodily fluids.  The disease can remain dormant, or develop actively, into a chronic condition which may threaten life by destroying liver functions. 

Helicobacter Pylori

Source: 
AFABC Special Needs Database

Definition
Helicobacter Pylori (HP) is a bacteria that lives in the stomach of a patient. It can survive the harsh acid climate of the stomach by hiding in the mucous lining, which protects the stomach from its own gastric juices. White blood cells arrive to defeat the invading infection but they are unable to do so. They die trying, and their death releases toxins, which were supposed to be used against intruders. Instead their deaths damage the stomach causing pain and often ulcers.

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