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Understanding medical reports

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Thoughts on the tricky business of understanding medical reports for children available for adoption, particularly from other countries.

Dr Julia Bledsoe could be described as a medical detective—she knows when something doesn’t sound or look right, what questions to ask, and how to find the answers.

FASD - Facts and services

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

The basics on FASD and some of the provincial services available to families for their kids with FASD

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) is used to describe the problems resulting from alcohol use during pregnancy.

Diary of an adoptive mom #33

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

In the 33rd of our series, our mom of three kids--Emily, Grant, and Lynn--finds a winter activity that all the family can enjoy.

We had so much fun! I’ve found an activity that suits all the family!

I hate winter and the thought of spending another season of timing everyone’s turn on the computer or video games, from November to March, was more than I could take. Perhaps I could take the kids skiing? I skied right up to my teen years. I had fun. They’d have fun too. Wouldn’t they?

Children and unresolved grief: Signs and treatment

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Shanna is 14 years old. She’s a lovely young  woman with dark hair and a bright smile. While she has a friendly manner and is comfortable conversing with adults, it’s clear that something is bothering her. It’s not so much what she says, as her body language and level of distractibility.

Shanna lives in a home with her two foster parents and four other children. She participates in chores, does her homework, spends time with her foster-siblings and hopes, one day, to be adopted. At this point, adoption is not the plan. She is in Neverland, that gray 

Ask the Experts: How to communicate difficult information to birth parents

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

A conversation with Lee Crawford and Brenda McCreight on everyday challenges.

How should adoptive parents approach their child’s birthparents about difficulties they are having with their child?

Brenda: The birthparents and grandparents having some limited, continued contact is very appropriate. But that doesn’t mean [birth parents] have a responsibility or access to what’s going on in your family, and I think that it is really important to not be over-sharing. They’re not entitled to know everything that’s going on.

Hair and skin care for kids: A guide for parents of black and bi-racial children

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

When Kelly Martin brought home her 21-month-old daughter, Kendall, there were all the common new-parent concerns: “How will I ever cut such tiny nails?” laughs Kelly. But Kendall is Haitian, and caring for black skin and hair was to be an additional learning experience for Kelly. Undaunted, she says, “I knew it was something I would have to learn.”

Breastfeeding is a choice for adoptive moms too

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Many people assume that breastfeeding is not an option in adoption. P’nina Shames interviewed two Kootenay- based adoptive moms, Carol and Sherri, who were successful. Here they share some of their secrets.

Why did you breastfeed?

Carol: I wanted to create the same bond with my adopted child that I have with my biological child. Besides being good for the baby, studies show that it helps reduce the risk of breast cancer.

How hereditary can intelligence be?

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Researchers have long overestimated the role our genes play in determining intelligence. As it turns out, cognitive skills do not depend on ethnicity, and are far more malleable than once thought. Targeted encouragement can help children from socially challenged families make better use of their potential.

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