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Helping children make sense of a painful birth history

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

1. Be proactive—use the "A" word from the moment your child comes home, even if he or she is pre-verbal. Seek opportunities to talk about adoption—movies, books, other families connected to adoption, and your child’s own adoption story at an age-appropriate level.

2. Connect the positive qualities in your child with their birth parents—even if you know nothing about them; for example, "I wonder if your birthmom/birthdad has your beautiful voice."

My Concept of Self: Growing up in a Multiracial Family

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Having grown up in a multiracial family, multiculturalism has always been a part of my life— and I couldn’t imagine it any other way. My parents have always encouraged us to develop individual identities and to stand tall and proud of who we are. It is true that every member of my family has a different self-identity; however, that is something that contributes to our family interactions and understandings. My family deeply loves one another and our differences have made us more accepting and liberal people.

Sense of humour required

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Passing "Perfect Parenting 101" requires humility and an occasional case of the giggles.

When I take a critical look at our parenting methods, there’s certainly a lot to laugh at. I have to admit that when we first entered this gig called parenting, we were much more serious and reserved. Yes, we laughed at first giggles and raspberries, and played rousing games of peek-a-boo; but the idea of laughing as an aid in discipline, or joking about a gaping wound, is something I would have put on my “never” list of parenting tactics.

Adopt-a Confusion

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

People who are involved with adoption issues on a daily basis are becoming increasingly concerned about the negative impact of programs taking an "adopt-a" theme which have proliferated since the Cabbage Patch doll craze of the early 1980’s.

Genomics, internet, and adoption

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

How biology and technology provide powerful tools for adoption reunion.

With advances in computer technology and DNA science, it seemed likely that a way would be found for the far-flung children of China to find their birth families. That day seemed far off. However, it has arrived 20 years before I expected it.

Finding family in the information age

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

To make technology work for you, harness your kids' skills

If someone told me ten years ago that I’d find my birth family online, I would have laughed. Ten years ago, we thought Y2K would spell the end of the internet. I never suspected this information superhighway would become my road to finding my sisters. But here I am, on the edge of my computer chair, on the brink of reunion.

The real Canadian family

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Michelle and David Huck married in 2000, and since then life has been a blur of backpacks, lunch kits and homework.

As parents to Indira, 10, Soleil, 9, Saul, 8, and Samuel, 6, the couple’s Calgary life is one long domestic balancing act — and they wouldn’t have it any other way.

"We’re at the dance studio, we’re playing the piano before school — it’s a gong show," Ms. Huck said.

The grandmother clause

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

The impact of including grandparents in the adoption (and post-adoption) process.

The impact of open adoption on birth and adoptive families is only beginning to be understood. Recent research explores the perspectives of birth grandmothers who had direct contact with their birth grandchildren. The findings clearly demonstrate some of the benefits and challenges of open adoption, the impact open adoption had on their lives, and how grandmothers see their role in the kinship network.

That cruely clean MacLeod family

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

The adoption process is a strange one—for everyone involved. I have no experience with what it is like to be adopted myself, or to be an adoptive parent. My understanding of adoption comes solely from my experiences as a child into whose home another child was adopted. 

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