International adoption

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My child wants to look like me

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Question

I recently found my seven-year-old African-Canadian daughter scrubbing her skin with a nail brush. She told me she wanted to be white like me. We have read books that portray people from other races in a positive light, and I have always talked very positively about her colour. She also has black friends at school. I am upset by her desire to change colour and I am not sure how to deal with this. Can you advise me?

What you need to know about international adoption facilitators

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Adoptive families exploring international adoption often wonder why "facilitators" are necessary in addition to their licensed adoption agency. This article explains what they do and gives advice to families who may work with a facilitator.

Not all international adoptions involve facilitators, but many do. Their functions vary, depending on the procedures required in the child’s country of origin. The facilitator usually arranges for translation and authentication of documents.

You promised! The importance of post-placement reports

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

You promised

For most, if not all international adoptions, post-placement reports are a requirement of the sending country. Adoptive families need to understand that these reports are more than a courtesy. While the agnecies and families who receive them are delighted to hear how the kids are doing, they also must forward the reports for their government. Some countries have been so concenred at the numver of post-placement reports not filed, that they actually suspend adoptions for a period of time.

The Coffee Connection—Parents Give Back to Guatemala

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

What’s the connection between coffee and adoption? Not too obvious, you might think. So did I, until I visited the coffee warehouse of Ethical Bean, a company owned by AFABC members Lloyd Bernhardt and Kim Schachte. Their decision to adopt a child from Guatemala almost five years ago not only resulted in them becoming parents but also transformed them into coffee experts and the owners of the thriving, Burnaby-based company.

Adopting orphans in times of disaster or war

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

For many Canadians the horrific images from the December 2004 Tsunami in South Asia, inspired the desire to adopt an orphaned child.

While these desires are normal, there are compelling reasons why adoption from war torn or disaster struck nations is strongly discouraged.

The United Nations (UN), stands strongly against any immediate adoptions in such situations and states; “Special care must be taken to prevent the hasty placement of children outside their own country.”

Finding a forever family: Better late than never

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

When Deborah Bailey and her husband Edward, first met their then three-and-a-half-year old daughter, Ola, in a Russian orphanage, her first words to them were, “You’re late.”

They immediately realized that this little preschooler was a force to be reckoned with. Deborah says that at the same time as Ola was being so forthright, she had a single tear in her eye. This was an early indication of Ola’s desperate need for belonging and her intense fear of it.

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