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Finding lost family through the Internet

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

As I prepared to adopt, I knew there was a “right” answer when it came to openness. Openness was good, and I needed to come across like I believed it. The truth was, openness scared me silly.

What I really hoped was that any child we adopted would have an unfortunate, yet complete, lack of background information, and that openness was something that I could favour without actually experiencing.

Diary of an Adoptive Mom #24

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

In the 24th of our series, our mom of three kids--Emily, Grant and Lynn--has made her decision not to adopt the unborn child of Emily’s birthmom. Since then things have gone very silent, and she’s wondering what on earth is happening.

It’s been two months since that first phone call from the adoption agency letting us know that Alexa was pregnant and she wanted us to adopt her new baby. We were told her due date was late May or early June and, since she hadn’t had any prenatal care, that was just an estimate.

Diary of an Adoptive Mom #23

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

In the 23rd of our series, our mom of three kids--Emily, Grant and Lynn--is still absorbing the news that Emily’s birthmom is pregnant and wants them to adopt the new baby. It’s a difficult decision, and everyone seems to think that she’s the one who should have to make it.

I phoned my husband at work, suggested he sits down, and tell him about Alexa being pregnant. Dead silence. When he finally spoke, he said, “That’s so great! A sibling of Emily’s! Wow! When is she due?”

Today's birth parents: Their needs and rights

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

There are still many myths and much misinformation about birth parents. Though the adoption community may be better educated than the general public, we also still have much to learn.

A year-long project, "Safeguarding the Rights and Well being of Birth Parents," by the US-based Evan B Donaldson Institute for Adoption, has much to teach us about today’s birth parents. Though the study focuses on the United States, many of the findings are relevant to the Canadian adoption community. In this article, we focus on some of the major points in the report.

Diary of an Adoptive Mom #28

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

In the 28th of our series, our mom of three kids, Emily, Grant and Lynn, evaluates what she wishes she knew before adopting kids with special needs, and what she’s glad she didn’t know.

Things I wish I’d known before adopting special needs kids:

Mail brings unexpected connection

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

When Chelsea was adopted, her young birthmom gave a letter, photo, bracelet, and blanket to her daughter. At first, her adoptive parents sent letters and photos via their social worker. Then each family moved and contact was lost—until now.

When I was a little girl, I used to love to jump out of the car when my dad stopped by the mailbox because I wanted to see if I got anything. Eventually the excitement wore off because I rarely did, but it was still my job to check the mail.

Adoption is a miracle too

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Adoptive mom Amanada Vincent asks, "Why do people insist on seeing adoption as second best?"

I do wish that people would think before implying that the recent birth of my son must have finally brought my heart’s desire.

To Russia with regrets

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

When a seven-year-old boy, adopted by an American family, was returned to Moscow with a note explaining that his new family no longer wanted him, there was universal outrage.

According to the adoptive grandmother, the family was unaware of the behavioural challenges the young boy had, and they became overwhelmed with fear after he openly fantasized about burning down the family home.

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