Parenting

AddToAny

Share

Extreme parenting: Goals, behaviours, and... ducks?

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

So far in this column I’ve talked quite a bit about my second son, Ethan. I’d like to give you a little bit more background information about him so you can better understand where I’m coming from. First of all, you should know that Ethan is very bright and has a great sense of humour. He has his own brand of wisdom, which lives just under the surface of his impulsive little boy exterior.

Ethan did a ton of work with counsellors and therapists prior to coming into our family. He has “feeling language” down to an art and truly tries to move and heal his troubled soul.

Waiting for you

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Do you like being small
or do you wish you were tall?

Are there freckles on your nose?
Do you have really big toes?

I’m waiting for you,
Are you waiting for me?

Do you like to climb to the top
or are you scared you will drop?

When it rains, do you like to cuddle?
Or would you rather jump in puddles?

I’m waiting for you,
Are you waiting for me?

Do you like to run really fast
Or do your friends go right past?

When you play hide-and-seek,
If you count, do you peek?

I’m waiting for you,
Are you waiting for me?

When Mother's Day hurts

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

All parenting has its ups and downs, and parenting adopted children is no different. One thing that is different is that there are certain times that tend to be more difficult for adopted kids than their non-adopted peers.

Holidays rank high as one of these difficult times. Like birthdays, the holidays are a natural time to reflect on family and the past, and this is often true for adopted children. For obvious reasons, Mother's Day and Father's Day are extremely common times for adopted children to feel down or to have a lot of questions about their birth parents.

PASS program

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Early intervention for adoptive families

“I was going through a very difficult time at the beginning of my adoption,” says adoptive mother Carrie Crowley. “I was breaking down and was desperate for support. I was isolated and emotionally exhausted.”

Open borders

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Learning about open adoption

When my husband Chris and I decided to walk through the adoption process for the first time, we heard from several social workers and adoptive families about what openness in adoption typically looked like. We were adopting from the United States; in most international adoption situations, openness seemed to mean having occasional contact by letter, email or phone, which usually died out after the first few years.

Top tips when choosing Aboriginal adoption

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Are you adopting children of Aboriginal heritage, or thinking about it? Indigenous social worker Kelly Davie shares her wisdom about travelling this unique path.

Keep an open heart, an open mind, and laughter in your life; it will serve the family well.

Be patient with yourself and others, and persevere. The path to permanency can be much longer than we first imagine.

Diary of an Adoptive Mom #22

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

In the 22nd of our series, our mom of three kids--Emily, Grant, and Lynn--receives a dramatic phone call, one that she had always secretly hoped for but also dreaded. When it finally comes, it unleashes some very strong emotions.

The day started off just like most of our days—a little on the crazy side.

It was a warm spring day and the kids were actually getting along—probably because I was keeping Lynn and Grant apart so that she couldn’t push him off the top of the slide.

Summer camp and adoption

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Most North American children go to summer camp at some point in their childhood. Camps can be great fun, they help with developing independence and, overall, can be very enriching. But, for some adopted children, there may be extra challanges involved in the summer camp experience. Here are some great tips on what to consider before you sign up your child.

Diary of an Adoptive Mom #19

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

In the nineteenth of our series, our mom of three kids--Emily and her new siblings, Grant and Lynn--wonders why so much information about her childrens’ past is still unavailable, and why she’s listed as Mom on their birth certificates.

The other day I started to think about all my kids’ personal information being completely sealed and stored in some undisclosed location in Victoria. I just don’t understand why we can never access it again. 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Parenting