Prospective adoptive parents

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Birth parent expenses and USA adoptions

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

The Adoption Act 1996, regulates adoptions in BC, and is specific about what birth mother expenses prospective adoptive parents might expect to pay [see sidebar]. Medical expenses related to the prenatal care and birth of the baby are not usually covered unless the mother doesn't have medical coverage from any other source. Thankfully, our Medical Services Plan will almost always cover these expenses.

This is not the case in the United States—a fact that prospective adoptive parents considering US adoption need to consider.

Canada’s top employers and adoption benefits

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

It is difficult to conceive why new adoptive parents would not receive employee benefits equal to those biological parents enjoy. As every adoptive parent knows, the process of bringing children home for the first time, introducing them to their new home, and establishing a strong parent-child bond, takes considerable time and work.

However, employers still don’t offer new adoptive parents the same employee benefits as biological parents, particularly in respect to those employers that top up the Employment Insurance payments given by the Canadian government.

Crossing boundaries—Agency goes the distance

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

A glance at a list of adoption agencies in BC appears to indicate that whole swathes of the province are not served. All but two of BC’s licensed agencies are located in the Lower Mainland and Fraser Valley.

Marni Bodner, executive director of Kelowna’s Adoption Centre, emphasizes that while the geographical distribution may give the impression that families or birth parents in isolated communities don’t have access to agencies, this is certainly not the case. 

Enigmatic artwork symbolizes adoption process

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

As our social worker was leaving our home after our final homestudy visit, she noticed our latest purchase hanging on the wall—a colourful plaque featuring a whimsical picture of two faces playing instruments and set on a page of musical notes. The plaque is called Musical Masquerade and we bought it to commemorate our adoption process.

Are you ready for a toddler?

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Every toddler without a  family is ready for a placement, but not every prospective adoptive family is ready for a toddler. The good news is that the vast majority of parents who have the ability to be effective adoptive parents can develop the skills to parent an adopted toddler, but there are unique concerns and issues that need to be considered.

Are you prepared for transracial adoption?

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Personality
Transracial adoption means that your family becomes “public” because your differences are readily apparent to others. Do you feel sick at the thought of the lady in the grocery store who asks inappropriate questions about your child, or do you relish the thought of learning how to help your child develop the strength and capacity to cope with racial bias?  As a parent, you will be “on display.” You will need to seek help from adult mentors of colour who understand firsthand your children’s experiences in ways that you can’t.

Unconditional Commitment: The Only Love That Matters To Teens

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Having directed both foster care and adoption programs that place teenagers into permanent families, and then having founded an agency that places teenagers into permanent families, I often get asked, “What kind of people will offer their home permanently to a teenager?” My answer is always the same, “Any and all kinds of people who, after a good preparation experience, are willing to unconditionally commit themselves to a child no matter what behavior that child might ultimately exhibit.” Teenagers need, first and foremost, at least one adult who will unconditionally commit to and claim th

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