Waiting parents

AddToAny

Share

Path to adoption

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

What can be written about adoption that hasn’t already been written? There are many of these personal narratives and each one is unique. My story is not unlike the many others, but it is mine and has helped to make me who I am today.

Having a child was always in my genes. I was raised in a family of five. All of my siblings have families of three to four children each. Growing up, I was known as the “babysitter on my block” and when I got older I was Auntie to 13 nieces and nephews. I love children.

But sometimes destiny isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.

The proposal process explained

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Cathy Gilbert has been through the MCFD proposal process dozens of times (she’s adopted 11 children). Here, she shares what she’s learned.

Accepting a proposal is one of the biggest decisions you’ll ever make—it needs to an informed one.

Once parents, or a social worker have seen a potential child and parent match, information is given to the prospective parents in order for them to decide whether to move ahead. At this stage, basic, non-identifying information is given which may include:

The benefits of big

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Do big adoptive families work better for children with attachment issues? The families we spoke to all think so.

These days, having numerous kids tends to be considered eccentric. For some children though, a bursting-at-the-seams-family may be exactly what they need.

Diary of an Intercountry Adoptive Mom #4

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

In the fourth of our series, we present the edited diary of Mary Ella, who is in Korea with her husband Wayne, only hours away from taking charge of their long-awaited daughter, Hee Young (Leelee).

Day #5, June 28, continued.

Mrs. Kang had asked us earlier when we wanted to take Hee Young, and we told her as soon as possible. Though, as much as I wanted her with us today, I felt it would be best to let her have one more night as a family with her foster parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ra.

The language of hurt kids

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

Psychologists have given us a concept of non-verbal communication that makes an incredible amount of sense in the context of adoption—it is called inducement.

Those of us who live or work with adopted children need to understand that inducement is the language of the abandoned. Inducement is the most important conceptual tool we have to understand why children act the way they do.

Adoption with the help of the Internet: Pros and cons

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

The Canada Adopts website describes itself as a place where prospective adoptive families and birth families connect. It boasts that it is the only Internet site that provides adoption-related information and a parent registry in one place.

Two adoptive parents in Calgary, who adopted their first child through a similar US service, started Canada Adopts.

The website allows adoptive parents to post a personal profile, a “Dear Birth Mother” letter, a family photo album, a description of their family, and the contact info for the agency they are working with. 

Waiting Child Finally Becomes the Centre of Attention

Source: 
Focus on Adoption magazine

The parents of biological children know their child’s prenatal history and most of what we might call their medical inheritance. Adoptive parents, even those who adopt “healthy newborns,” usually have far less information. They must take a leap of faith that all will be well and, that if the child has unexpected disabilities or challenges, that they will adapt and cope.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Waiting parents